Five talking points from the draw with Nottingham Forest

Wigan Athletic 2 Nottingham Forest 2

 

It was another scintillating performance from Wigan Athletic, making Forest look distinctly mediocre. But a soft penalty decision in the 89th minute gave the visitors a point they did not deserve.

Let’s take a look at some points arising from the game:

No team can play at full throttle for 90+ minutes

Latics attacked Forest from the start, their high pressing and high tempo approach causing all kinds of problems for the visitors’ defence. They were quite superb in the first half, the 2-1 score line at the interval not reflecting their dominance.

However, no team can play at full throttle for 90+ minutes. As the second half wore on the intensity and quality of Wigan’s football diminished. Forest got more and more into the game and Latics were penned in their own half for several minutes, a resolute defence keeping out a seemingly interminable series of corner kicks from the visitors.

Uwe Rosler’s team in 2013-14 often played the high press. Although they could rarely keep it going for more than 30 minutes it was often enough to upset the opposition defence and go in for half time with a lead. With experienced and capable goalkeepers and defenders they were so often able to repel the opposition attackers in the second half.

Paul Cook’s Latics are a younger side on a steep learning curve in the Championship. It could be said that the penalty decision robbed them of a well-deserved win, but they could have put the game out of sight from Forest if they had converted more of their chances in that first half.

An eventful afternoon for Sam Morsy

Sam Morsy is an inspirational captain who does so much to enable the smooth running of Cook’s machine. Morsy is a complete player, not only dogged in defence, but enterprising when he goes forward. Cook likes to give his full backs the opportunity to bomb forward and Antonee Robinson is particularly good at doing that.  When Robinson goes forward it is Morsy who covers him. Until yesterday he had done that well, but this time Morsy was dispossessed leaving the left side of the defence open, resulting in Forest’s first goal.

Despite his early error the captain continued to drive his team forward and was unlucky with a fine shot that hit the post. Together with the excellent Lee Evans he continued to control the midfield. Once again we were to see the fiery side of the captain late in the second half in the middle of an altercation between the two sides.

Then came the penalty decision. There are those who would argue that Morsy clearly fouled Cash, others who would say that Cash dived over Morsy’s outstretched leg. But the bottom line is that Morsy was reckless in putting himself in that position.

Strangely enough, without those two incidents that changed the game, Morsy would have been a candidate for “Man of the Match”.

Another side of Ben Watson

Ben Watson is now 33 and he joined Forest in February 2018 after being released by Watford. Latics’ cup final icon found himself on the bench yesterday but came on to applause after 45 minutes. Watson played for Latics from 2008 to 2015, making 107 appearances in the Premier League and the Championship. He was a fine servant for the club, with his positive and cultured approach.

However, what we saw yesterday from Watson was a bit of a surprise for us. Like Morsy he was at the centre of the altercation between the two teams late in the second half, also receiving a yellow card. Mobbing of the referee is something that football continues to tolerate, an ugly side of the great game. Whether the referee was going to award Forest a penalty or not after Cash’s fall before being intimidated by Watson and his teammates was hard to tell. But the vehemence and aggression of Watson and his teammates surely tested the determination of a weak referee. It was an unsavoury way to get a penalty decision and we saw a side of Watson that I do not recall seeing during his seven years at Wigan.

A role for James Vaughan

When James Vaughan came on to replace Will Grigg after 74 minutes it signalled a switch to long ball tactics for the home side. The service the player received was far from ideal, but as always, Vaughan gave his all, fighting for every ball.

No one will fault Vaughan for effort: it is the approach that Latics tend to use when he plays as a lone centre forward that is the issue. Were Vaughan a kind of battering-ram central striker like Atdhe Nuhiu the long ball tactic might be more effective, but it is not the best way to employ him. Vaughan has been most effective for Latics whilst playing alongside or behind a central striker.

A solid performance by the centre of defence

It has been a tough start for Cedric Kipre, being thrust into Championship football after just one full season of league football in the SPL. If Dan Burn had been available, Cook would have been able to nurture Kipre into being his replacement when “Superman” leaves in January. Instead he has had to throw the Ivorian in at the deep end.

Chey Dunkley too has had a baptism of fire in his first season in the second tier. With three less experienced players alongside him in the back four he has had additional responsibilities thrust upon him at a time when he too has been adjusting to playing in a higher division.

Both were solid yesterday, reacting well under pressure and starting to show that kind of mutual understanding that is so important in a central defensive line.

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4 responses

  1. As always, I appreciate your articles.
    A couple of observations –
    – Christian Walton was far better from cross pieces after looking indecisive in previous games
    – Reece James is strong and inspires confidence. Also (as is Robinson) fast enough to recover from errors.
    – Kipre has impressed me more than Dunley, who appears a little slow
    – Wigan’s first goal was “different”. Winning a corner without touching the ball once. Scoring with just the second touch of the ball – a record or equaling a record ?
    – your observation on Vaughan is interesting. Wigan’s pass rate success appeared to be dropping – tiredness?? – is that why the long ball came in ??

    And surprisingly quiet on the takeover front after last week’s speculation.

    Thanks again. Latics fan in Mexico

    • Good to hear from you again, Christopher. Your observations make interesting comparisons.

      Agree on Walton. He is new in the second tier and will need time to adjust.

      James is certainly strong and looks destined to become a top player. However, he is just 18 and still learning. Nathan Byrne is experienced and was Player of the Year for both the fans and the players last season. Moreover he and Dunkley play well together on the right. We can expect Byrne to reclaim his place.

      Robinson is brilliant in attack, but less impressive in defence, with still lots to learn.

      Dunkley is adjusting to a higher division and not doing badly. It is easy to forget this is only his third season in the EFL. He may not be the fastest, but he looks to have enough pace to cope with most Championship attackers. The problem for he and Kipre is when the fullbacks are caught upfield and they are central defenders dealing with pacy wingers.

      Agree on your Vaughan point, but it his willingness to battle for long balls endears him to fans. But you could say the tactic is flawed – how about retaining possession and slowing down the game?

      Viva Cruz Azul de Mexico!

      Tony/JJ

  2. Hi there, totally agree with your observations on Watson. He was the catalyst for much of the ugly scenes during the second half. I must say I don’t understand all this fawning of ex players on their return to the DW. Watson not only failed to acknowledge the warm reception, he also tried to influence the referee in scenes reminiscent of the big six during our time in the Premier league. He has certainly gone down in my estimation, cup winning goal or not.

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